Ovarian cancer is a type of cancer that develops in the ovaries – the reproductive glands in women responsible for producing eggs. While not as common as other forms of cancer, ovarian cancer can be deadly if left untreated. It is important to be aware of the risk factors, symptoms, and treatment options associated with ovarian cancer.

Ovarian cancer is a type of cancer that develops in the ovaries, which are located on both sides of the uterus. It is the fifth most common cancer among women and is more common in women over the age of 50. Ovarian cancer can be difficult to detect in its early stages, but with early detection, it can be treated successfully.

How do we get infected with Ovarian Cancer?

The exact cause of ovarian cancer is unknown, but certain factors can increase a woman’s risk of developing the disease. These include a family history of ovarian or breast cancer, the use of fertility drugs, and obesity.

Signs and Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

The signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer can often be subtle or easily overlooked, particularly in the early stages of the disease. However, it is important to be aware of any changes in your body and to report them to your doctor.

Some common signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer include:

  • Abdominal bloating, swelling, or pain
  • Feeling full quickly when eating
  • Unexplained weight loss or gain
  • Changes in bowel or bladder habits
  • Fatigue or low energy levels
  • Pain during intercourse
  • Abnormal menstrual cycles
  • Back pain
  • Indigestion or nausea
  • Shortness of breath

Risk factors of Ovarian Cancer

There are several risk factors that can increase a woman’s chances of developing ovarian cancer. Some of these risk factors include:

  • Age: Ovarian cancer is more common in women over the age of 50.
  • Family history: Women with a family history of ovarian cancer, breast cancer, or colorectal cancer are at a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer.
  • BRCA gene mutations: Women who carry the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations are at an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer.
  • Personal history of cancer: Women who have had breast, colon, or rectal cancer may have an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer.
  • Endometriosis: Women with endometriosis, a condition where the tissue lining the uterus grows outside of the uterus, may be at an increased risk of developing ovarian cancer.
  • Hormone replacement therapy: Long-term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) after menopause may increase the risk of ovarian cancer.

When should you go to a doctor? 

It is important to consult a doctor if you experience any symptoms of ovarian cancer. Your doctor may recommend further tests to determine if ovarian cancer is the cause of your symptoms.

Treatment options for Ovarian Cancer

The treatment options for ovarian cancer may depend on several factors, such as the stage of the cancer, the patient’s overall health, and the type of ovarian cancer. Here are some common treatment options for ovarian cancer:

  • Surgery: Surgery is the primary treatment option for ovarian cancer. It involves removing as much of the cancer as possible. The type of surgery depends on the stage of the cancer and the extent of the spread. The surgeon may remove one or both ovaries, the fallopian tubes, the uterus, and nearby lymph nodes.
  • Chemotherapy: Chemotherapy is a type of treatment that uses drugs to kill cancer cells. It may be used before or after surgery to destroy any remaining cancer cells. Chemotherapy drugs can be given orally or intravenously, and the treatment can last for several months.
  • Radiation therapy: Radiation therapy uses high-energy radiation to kill cancer cells. It may be used in combination with chemotherapy or surgery. Radiation therapy is usually given externally, which means that the radiation is directed at the affected area from outside the body.
  • Targeted therapy: Targeted therapy is a newer treatment option for ovarian cancer. It involves drugs that target specific proteins or genes in cancer cells. Targeted therapy can be used alone or in combination with chemotherapy.
  • Hormone therapy: Hormone therapy is a treatment option for ovarian cancer that has hormone receptors. Hormone therapy drugs block the production of hormones that can stimulate the growth of cancer cells.

It’s important to remember that each person’s treatment plan is unique, and the best treatment for one person may not be the best for another. Treatment plans should be discussed with a healthcare provider who specializes in ovarian cancer.

We use cookies to ensure you get the best experience on Asian Hospital. By continued use, you accept our use of such cookies.